FMT Transplantation of gut microbiota derived from patients with schizophrenia induces schizophrenia-like behaviors and dysregulated brain transcript response in mice (Apr 2024)

Fecal Microbiota Transplants

Michael Harrop

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https://www.nature.com/articles/s41537-024-00460-6

Abstract​

Schizophrenia (SCZ), as a neurodevelopmental disorder and devastating disease, affects approximately 1% of the world population. Although numerous studies have attempted to elucidate the causes of SCZ occurrence, it is not clearly understood. Recently, the emerging roles of the gut microbiota in a range of brain disorders, including SCZ, have attracted much attention. While the molecular mechanism of gut microbiota in regulating the pathogenesis of SCZ is still lacking.

Here, we first confirmed the difference of gut microbiome between SCZ patients and healthy controls, and then, we performed fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) to clarify the roles of SCZ patients-derived microbiota in a specific pathogen free (SPF) mice model.

16 S rDNA sequencing confirmed that a significant difference of gut microbiome was present between two groups of FMT mice, which has a similar trend with the above human gut microbiome. Furthermore, we found that transplantation of fecal microbiota from SCZ patients into SPF mice was sufficient to induce schizophrenia-like (SCZ-like) symptoms, such as deficits in sociability and hyperactivity.

Furthermore, the brains of mice colonized with SCZ microbiota displayed dysregulated transcript response and alternative splicing of SCZ-relevant genes. Moreover, 10 key genes were identified to be correlated with SCZ by an integrative transcriptome data analysis. Finally, 4 key genes were identified to be correlated with the 12 differential genera between two groups of FMT mice.

Our results thus demonstrated that the gut microbiome might modify the transcriptomic profile in the brain, thereby modulating social behavior, and our present study can help better understand the link between gut microbiota and SCZ pathogenesis through the gut-brain axis.
 
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In April-July 2015 at age 21 I had an untreated psychotic episode (not full blown schizophr which resulted in persistent concentration/focus issues as a consequence of which I have been unable to watch a single episode of a tv series on a single go... I went from being able to easily watch 8-10 episodes per day to barely watching 1-2 :(.

I wonder if FMT could help me or is my brain permanently damaged?
 
In April-July 2015 at age 21 I had an untreated psychotic episode (not full blown schizophr which resulted in persistent concentration/focus issues as a consequence of which I have been unable to watch a single episode of a tv series on a single go... I went from being able to easily watch 8-10 episodes per day to barely watching 1-2 :(.

I wonder if FMT could help me or is my brain permanently damaged?
Hi Otto. Im just curious, I have an older family member that was in a similar plight as yourself with the dreaded SCZ. It didn't happen over night but on there own after many unsuccessful attempts at treatment and new approaches to there over all health, a doctor tested his MTHFR gene. Sure enough, he was terribly life long deficient and unable to fully utilize and absorb B-Vitamins. Im not a doctor and dont know anything els besides the fact that after the MTHFR test, he was and is still taking a B-complex powder every morning in some juice. After about 3 or 4 weeks he described it as something just calmed his brain down and the episodes subsided. Very rarely anymore about 3.5 years later does he suffer. He is in his mid 50's. His MTHFR test was almost not even related to his SCZ issues, it just so happen to point out his body genetically was B deficient and the supplementation helped him. I know were on an FMT forum but if I could offer anything on behalf of my one of my ex-wifes Uncle whom found something that worked for him.
 
I have heard there can be a link between depression, magnesium deficiency and lacking beneficial gut microbes. I have also wondered if this could be the case in those with schizophrenia as well.
 
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